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Get your copy of September 2011 Issue of LALIT Magazine

02.09.2011


The latest issue of REVI LALIT came out on Thursday 1 September (Number 101.) It is the only proper political review in the country, and gives a good understanding of the tumultuous events of the times.
Articles on the Mauritian political scene include an “With the economic and political crises, what needs to be done?”, as well as an article on “The economic crisis behind the political one”, “The ongoing political crisis and the Medpoint scandal”, “Electoral Reform or Sharing Political Loot” plus an analysis on “How to prevent your tactics betraying your Strategies” with reference to the struggles for Diego Garcia and against the Best Loser System. There is also an article on “Mutations in the trade union struggle”, a twin article to the previous one on “Fragmentation in the trade union movement”. There is a page on the freight increases affecting prices in Rodrigues, and one on the return to precarious work conditions in the fields. LALIT also includes art reviews: one on the graffiti artist Banksy, one on the three sets of trio concerts in Mauritius, and one on two books that relate to the Sudan. There is also an anlysis of “critical tipping points” in ecology, as part of a reference to the new John Bellamy Foster book.
On the international situation, there is an overview of “The political situation world-wide”, an article on Palestine, one comparing the recent riots in England with the 1999 ones in Mauritius, and two articles on Libya.
There is a column with an outline of LALIT’s political actions over the past two months, as well as some general activism news under the heading “Info Info”. And of course there is the political satire Jabaljas and Bulbak that everyone turns to the minute they get their REVI LALIT. It’s always a good laugh.
REVI LALIT is almost entirely in Kreol (there is one article in French and one letter to the Prime Minister about the UN resolution in September on Palestine, in English.)
It costs Rs20.